Great players: George Singleton

George falls into both the category of great players and officials. After a career in Irish soccer he starred as a half-back for Ulster United. After retiring as a player he became a coach and later vice-president of Ulster United.

George was born on December 7, 1904 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. He grew up in Ballymena where he started playing for Victoria Rangers. They were the losing finalist in the 1921-22 County Antrim Junior Challenge Shield cup final. George then joined Summerfield of the Irish Intermediate League. While playing left half for that club he impressed scouts from many Irish League clubs. In August 1927 he signed for Belfast club Linfield. After a season playing mostly for their reserve side the Linfield Swifts, George decided to emigrate to Canada.

George arrived in Canada on July 22, 1928. He quickly settled in Toronto and started playing soccer for Ulster United. The Ulstermen won the National Soccer League Western Section championship, the British Consols Cup and the 1928 Lord Atholstan Cup, symbolic of the National Soccer League championship.

Then followed a spell with the Toronto Irish club, where George was the captain of the team. Before the 1934 season he re-joined Ulster United and straight away helped them win the 1933 Lord Atholstan Cup. The finals against Montreal Carsteel had been postponed from the 1933 season due to bad weather and fixture congestion.

Ulster United repeated as 1934 Lord Atholstan Cup champions. They again defeated Montreal Carsteel in the finals. The first game was played on October 20, 1934 in Toronto. The second game was delayed until August 4, 1935.

In the 1937 season George starred for the Ulster United team that went all the way to Dominion Cup finals. They also won the British Consols Cup.

After retiring as a player George was a coach, manager and vice-president at Ulster United. As a vice-president he worked closely for many years with Ulster United president George Waring. Under their leadership Ulster United won every possible trophy available in the 1946 season. The Redhanders won the Dominion Cup, the Ontario Major League title, the Consols Cup, the Dunlop Cup and the Harris Trophy in that season.

George died on December 30, 1951 at the age of 48. He dropped dead while walking with one of his eight children.

Sources: 
newspapers.com 
britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk 
Toronto Star Archives

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